Here are several books that I talk about during That Reading Thing training.

I don’t recommend any particular booksellers but I always search the following for used copies:

www.abebooks.co.uk

www.amazon.co.uk

For new copies, I search www.bookbrain.co.uk

Foundation Levels – It’s most challenging to find “real reading” material for students who are working (rather than flying) through these levels.

Random Acts of Kindness – 365 ways to make the world a nicer place, Danny Wallace, ISBN:0091901758. This book is suitable for any older struggler. There are pages with larger print and words that are decodable right from Level 2.

Star Quest, Usbourne Fantasy Adventure, Andrew Dixon, ISBN:0746070136. Fantastic for 11 and 12 year olds who are working in the Foundation Levels. Hint: I type out the pages into a size 14 font and read from there first. Then we read it again from the book and do all the activities.

Advanced Levels

Mysteries of the Universe, Colin Wilson, Dorling Kindersely (there are several ISBNs – search by title & author). “It’s Raining Fish” is fun to read once you done the “er” sound in Levels 26 & 27. Pick and choose according to sounds and interest.

True Mysteries, Terry Deary, ISBN-10: 0439014379, ISBN-13: 978-0439014373. This has been great for the year 9s (13-14 year olds). There are no pictures and small print.  The stories are good for checking that they’re creating a picture in their heads while they’re reading. It’s out of print but there are loads of used copies on Amazon.

B.C Provincial Police Stories, Cecil Clark (my husband’s grandfather), ISBN:0919214754. This is a very difficult book with lots of unusual words and ideas so it is best for those who are reading well and coping with the Advanced Levels but still need some support. It also has some difficult sentence structure. I usually choose a story and type in out in a larger font with better spacing. I also simplify some of the complex sentences. BUT I always have the book on hand. The old photos are fantastic and the book is clearly not for people who can’t read. The young people I’ve worked with particularly like the stories, “Footprints to the Gallows” and “Shackled, Starved and Chained”.